Programma

2019-09-16

09:30

  • Key-note lecture

    Lecturer: John Douglas, University of Strathclyde

    Topic: Seismic hazard

    Time: 09:30 - 10.30

    Title: Capturing epistemic uncertainty in earthquake ground motion models

    Abstract.  Our knowledge of earthquake ground motions of engineering significance varies geographically. The prediction of earthquake shaking in parts of the globe with high seismicity and a long history of observations from dense strong-motion networks, such as coastal California, much of Japan and central Italy, should be associated with lower uncertainty than ground-motion models for use in much of the rest of the world, where moderate and large earthquakes occur infrequently and monitoring networks are sparse or only recently installed. This variation in uncertainty, however, is not often captured in the models currently used for seismic hazard assessments, particularly for national or continental-scale studies. One recent technique for the development of ground-motion models is the so-called "backbone" approach, which becoming increasingly employed to develop ground-motion models for use within probabilistic seismic hazard assessments. This technique provides a relatively simple means of transparently capturing epistemic uncertainties in ground-motion models. One of the principal challenges in applying the backbone approach is its calibration so that the branches of the ground-motion logic tree capture the appropriate level of epistemic uncertainty. This is particularly difficult for regions with limited strong-motion data, which are generally areas of lower seismicity. In this talk I will introduce the backbone approach and discuss methods for calibrate the approach using empirical data and stochastic models.

     

14:30

  • Key-note lecture

    Lecturer: Roberto Paolucci, Politecnico di Milano

    Topic: Seismic hazard

    Time: 14:30 - 15.30

    Title: Seismic hazard and seismic input for design

2019-09-17

09:00

  • Key-note lecture

    Lecturer: Anastasios Sextos, University of Bristol

    Topic: Bridge risk assessment

    Time: 09:00 - 10.00

    Title: Seismic risk and resilience assessment of roadway networks in earthquake prone areas

    Abstract. Quantifying the resilience of road networks, defined as their ability to withstand, adapt to, and rapidly recover after a disruptive event, is a challenging issue of paramount importance towards holistic disaster risk mitigation and management. This talk aims to present a comprehensive, multi-criterion framework for mitigating the overall loss expected to be experienced by the community due to future earthquake events. The latter is decoupled into the direct structural damage-related loss and the indirect loss associated with the travel delays of the network users, as well as the wider socio-economic consequences in the affected area. In order to reflect the multi-dimensional nature of loss, a set of novel, time-variant indicators is herein introduced, while cumulative indicators are proposed for assessing the total loss incurred throughout the entire recovery period. This probabilistic risk management framework is implemented into a software to facilitate informed decisions of the stakeholders, both before and after a major earthquake event, thus prioritizing the pre-disruption strengthening schemes and accelerating the inspection and recovery measures, respectively.

14:30

  • Key-note lecture

    Lecturer: Franco Braga, Presidente ANIDIS

    Topic: Bridge risk assessment

    Time: 14:30 - 15.30

    Title: Il rischio sismico dei ponti in Italia

2019-09-18

09:00

  • Key-note lecture

    Lecturer: André Plumier, Univerité de Liège

    Topic: EC8 advancements

    Time: 09:00 - 10.00

    Title: Advancement in the revision of Eurocode 8 rules for new buildings: an overview

    Abstract. The existing Eurocode 8 is a robust code but, after more than 15 years of use, there were justified requests for revision. The work is under way and the final draft for the design of new buildings will be ready in 2020. In this document, some improvements, like the extension of the applicability of elastic design to zones of greater seismicity, the introduction of a "light" ductility class and the revision of effective width of slab, respond to a general CEN wish for a greater ease of use. Some other modifications result from the extension of knowledge on systems covered incompletely or not at all in the existing edition of EC8: isolators, dampers, BRB's, lightweight steel structures, timber structures, masonry infills, aluminium structures. Pushover analysis is now pratically applicable as data for modelling of dissipative zones are explicit in the code. Some difficulties which appeared in the revision process will be explained.

14:30

  • Key-note lecture

    Lecturer: Sergio Lagomarsino, Università di Genova

    Topic: EC8 advancements

    Time: 14:30 - 15.30

    Title: Valutazione della risposta sismica del costruito storico: criticità e prospettive

2019-09-19

09:00

  • Key-note lecture

    Lecturer: Maria Gabriella Castellano, FIP mec srl

    Topic: Damage reduction in non-structural components

    Time: 09:00 - 10.00

    Title: 40 years of seismic isolation in Italy: from bridges to buildings and art objects

    Abstract. Seismic isolation in Italy started in viaducts in the seventies and for the first two decades most Italian isolated structures were bridges and viaducts. Seismically isolated buildings were quite few in Italy until 2003, when the new standard (OPCM 3274) following the tragedy of 2002 San Giuliano's earthquake removed the need of approval from the Board of Public Works for projects of seismically isolated structures and introduced specific chapters on their design. The use of seismic isolation increased after 2009 L'Aquila earthquake, both in bridges and in buildings. In new buildings, seismic isolation started to be used not only in strategic buildings, such as hospitals or schools, but in residential buildings as well. Retrofit of existing buildings with seismic isolation was carried out in many cases, mostly in reinforced concrete buildings but also in some masonry buildings, but most of such interventions are in buildings damaged by the earthquake and declared unusable. Unfortunately, the potentiality of seismic isolation together with the tax deductions offered by the Italian State for seismic retrofit interventions on existing buildings (SISMABONUS) is not yet fully understood by the majority of professionals.

    Amongst the well known advantages of seismic isolation, one of the most important for buildings is its ability to reduce damage in non-structural components, thanks to the reduction of the acceleration transmitted to the superstructure, as well as the reduction of the amplification of said acceleration along the building's height. The damage in the partitions is reduced thanks to the strong reduction in the interstorey drift, and the low acceleration reduces damage in the building's content as well, guaranteing full functionality after strong earthquake. These are the reasons why seismic isolation was initially used in strategic buildings, in particular hospitals. However, recent earthquakes have demonstrated that the damage in recent buildings is mainly concentrated in non-structural components, and thus the enormous social and economical costs of an earthquake could be strongly reduced if seismic isolation is widely used both in new buildings and in existing buildings. In this talk I will show examples of use of seismic isolation in both new and existing building, with focus on seismic isolation systems that are more effective in the reduction of damage in non-structural components.

    When seismic isolation of the entire building is not possible, the most precious or sensitive objects can be protected through seismic isolation. For example, art objects in museums, or servers in data centers. An introduction to the isolation systems for objects will be given.